Legend of the Five Rings Art
japaneseaesthetics:

Inro with fish and sea creature design by Kakosai, Japan 19th century.  Laquered wood, shell, horn, coloured ivory.  Inro (‘seal-basket’) are small decorative containers that hang from the waist. They originated at the end of the sixteenth century and were worn by men to hold seals and herbal and other medicines. They were considered a particularly good way of keeping the contents sealed and fresh. By the eighteenth century they had become decorative accessories and were commissioned by the merchant class, provincial rulers and their samurai, and those that could afford them.  text and image via VAM

japaneseaesthetics:

Inro with fish and sea creature design by Kakosai, Japan 19th century.  Laquered wood, shell, horn, coloured ivory.  Inro (‘seal-basket’) are small decorative containers that hang from the waist. They originated at the end of the sixteenth century and were worn by men to hold seals and herbal and other medicines. They were considered a particularly good way of keeping the contents sealed and fresh. By the eighteenth century they had become decorative accessories and were commissioned by the merchant class, provincial rulers and their samurai, and those that could afford them.  text and image via VAM

allasianflavours:

まっすぐ by ( ´_ゝ`) Sho

jibadojo:

Ken Jutsu practice, ken suburi. Katana the best friend of aikido’s praticer

kezrekade:

Yangdong village

kezrekade:

Yangdong village

filmslookingatyou:

Seven Samurai (1954) by Akira Kurosawa.

tsmskimonodrome:

Asylum-Art :

A Huge Collection of Embroidered silk Spheres by 92-year-old grandmother in Japan.

THESE Intricate and Extraordinarily beautiful Embroidered Silk balls Are a form of Japanese Folk Art called Temari , Which Means “hand Ball” in Japanese. THESE Particular Temari Are even more Impressive BECAUSE They Were Handmade by a 92-year-old Grandmother in Japan. NanaAkua’s flickr

 

tsmskimonodrome:

Fromthefloatingworld :

Hinamatsuri by Sam-in-Japan on Flickr.

Hinamatsuri “Doll Festival” or girls day, is a festival of dolls here in Japan. Usually, you can find displays of rows of dolls symbolizing the royal court. The amount of tiers of dolls varies regionally, as does what the dolls are holding and what They SYMBOLIZE. Here in Nakatsu, we HAD a “Living Hinamatsuri” display going on in front of the Castle, Nakatsu-Jo.

tsmskimonodrome:

Fromthefloatingworld :

Hinamatsuri by Sam-in-Japan on Flickr.

Hinamatsuri “Doll Festival” or girls day, is a festival of dolls here in Japan. Usually, you can find displays of rows of dolls symbolizing the royal court. The amount of tiers of dolls varies regionally, as does what the dolls are holding and what They SYMBOLIZE. Here in Nakatsu, we HAD a “Living Hinamatsuri” display going on in front of the Castle, Nakatsu-Jo.

fromthefloatingworld:

明治神宮
my photo

fromthefloatingworld:

明治神宮

my photo

japaneseaesthetics:

Main detail of “Under the Wave off Kanagawa”, from the Thirty-six Views of Mt Fuji.  Woodblock print by Katsushika Hokusai , 1830-33, Japan.  BritishMuseum
 This is perhaps the single most famous of Hokusai’s woodblock prints - perhaps of all Japanese prints. It belongs to the series ‘Thirty-six views of Mount Fuji' (Fugaku sanjûrokkei). The graceful snow-clad mountain stands out unperturbed against the deep blue of the horizon. Yet it is reduced to a tiny hillock compared with the towering strength of the wave which threatens to engulf the struggling boats. Such clever, playful manipulation of the composition is a feature of many of Hokusai's works.

japaneseaesthetics:

Main detail of “Under the Wave off Kanagawa”, from the Thirty-six Views of Mt Fuji.  Woodblock print by Katsushika Hokusai , 1830-33, Japan.  BritishMuseum

 This is perhaps the single most famous of Hokusai’s woodblock prints - perhaps of all Japanese prints. It belongs to the series ‘Thirty-six views of Mount Fuji' (Fugaku sanjûrokkei). The graceful snow-clad mountain stands out unperturbed against the deep blue of the horizon. Yet it is reduced to a tiny hillock compared with the towering strength of the wave which threatens to engulf the struggling boats. Such clever, playful manipulation of the composition is a feature of many of Hokusai's works.